Hummingbirds found in New Hampshire, USA

Hummingbirds found in the USA (by U.S. State)CanadaMexicoPuerto RicoJamaicaHonduras


Hummingbird InformationHummingbird Species Photo Gallery

Only 3 hummingbird species are currently known to occur naturally in New Hampshire.

Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, Archilochus colubris – Native – Usually arrive in the first week of May, with males usually being the first to show up to stake out their feeding territories. Most leave toward the end of September. Males usually depart first, and females and the young follow about two weeks later.

The male has a ruby-red throat, a white collar, an emerald green back and a forked tail.

The female has a green back and tail feathers that are banded white, black and grey-green.

Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Archilochus colubris

Rufous Hummingbirds Selasphorus rufus — Like the Ruby-throated Hummingbirds, they usually arrive in the first week of May, with males usually being the first to show up to stake out their feeding territories. Most leave toward the end of September. Males usually depart first, and females and the young follow about two weeks later.

These hummingbirds are usually found in gardens and at feeders. These birds are fearless, and are known for chasing away other hummingbirds and even larger birds, or rodents away from their favorite nectar feeders and flowers.

Males can easily be identified by their glossy orange-red throats.

Females have whitish, speckled throats, green backs and crowns, and rufous, white-tipped tail feathers.

Rufous Hummingbird

Rufous Hummingbird versus the similar Ruby-throated Hummingbird (Identification)


Recently photographed in Manchester, New Hampshire: http://ottoc.zenfolio.com/nh_birds He was observed daily from October 6 through November 23, 2013

Calliope Hummingbirds (Stellula calliope) –Non-breeding Vagrant – these hummingbirds breed along the migrate south or east for the winter. This is the first instance of them being reported as far east as New Hampshire.

The smallest breeding bird in North America. They are most easily confused with the Rufous Hummingbirds and the Broad-tailed Hummingbird.

Calliope Hummingbird

Is it a Hummingbird or an Insect?

American hawk moth

The Hawk Moths (often referred to as “Hummingbird Moth”) is easily confused with hummingbirds, as they have similar feeding and swift flight patterns. These moths also hover in midair while they feed on nectar.

Moths have a couple of sensors or “antennas” on top of the head, which are key identifiers.

Photo of author

Gordon Ramel

Gordon is an ecologist with two degrees from Exeter University. He's also a teacher, a poet and the owner of 1,152 books. Oh - and he wrote this website.

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