birds

Araripe Manakins

Araripe Manakins (Antilophia bokermanni)

The Araripe Manakins (Antilophia bokermanni) is a critically endangered Manakins (Pipridae) that was first discovered in 1996 by Galileu Coelho and Weber Silva. A survey in 2006, estimated a population of only 800 individuals. Therefore, it is considered to be one of the rarest birds in the world.

Description

The Araripe Manakins averages 14.5 cm in length.

The males have a white plumage, except for the mostly black wings and tail, and the red feather crown with a frontal tuft. The crown (top of the head) and mid-back are also red.

The females are mostly olive green with a paler abdomen and a smaller olive green frontal tuft above the bill.

The irises are red.

Distribution

In Brazil, its range is restricted to a very small area at the base of the Chapada do Araripe in south Ceara. They usually occur in pairs.

Diet / Feeding

The Araripe Manakins feed on the fruits of Cordia species.

Calls / Vocalizations

Its song sounds like a musical warbling ‘guru-uguru-uguru-u’. They also make ‘wreee pur’ calls.

 

Gordon Ramel

Gordon is an ecologist with two degrees from Exeter University. He's also a teacher, a poet and the owner of 1,152 books. Oh - and he wrote this website.

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